How To sequence the 16s and ITS fungal gene affordably  MR DNA 16s sequencing microbiome and metagenome low prices

16s rRNA Sequencing with MR DNA

16S ribosomal  (rRNA) sequencing using next generation sequencing is a method used to identify and compare bacteria and archaea present within almost any type of sample. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a well-established method for studying phylogeny and taxonomy of samples from complex microbiomes or environments that are difficult or impossible to study.

 

 

 

 

16s sequencing illumina or PGM low cost prices with MR DNA

MR DNA is a next generation sequencing provider with low cost 16s sequencing services.

 

 

 

 

 

Select item 27660605

 

69.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2016 Sep 21. pii: fiw197. [Epub ahead of print]

Lettuce and rhizosphere microbiome responses to growth promoting Pseudomonas species under field conditions.

Cipriano MA1, Lupatini M2, Lopes-Santos L3, da Silva MJ4, Roesh LF5, Destéfano SA3, Freitas SS6, Kuramae EE7.

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Abstract

Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are well described and recommended for several crops worldwide. However, one of the most common problems in PGPR research is the difficulty in obtaining reproducible results. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated plant growth promotion and soil microbial community composition due to bacterial inoculation under field conditions. Here we evaluated the effect of 54 Pseudomonas strains on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) growth. The 12 most promising strains were phylogenetically and physiologically characterized for plant growth-promoting traits including phosphate solubilization, hormone production and antagonism to pathogen compounds and their effect on plant growth under farm field conditions. Additionally, the impact of beneficial strains on the rhizospheric bacterial community was evaluated for inoculated plants. The strains IAC-RBcr4 and IAC-RBru1, with different plant growth promoting traits, improved lettuce plant biomass yields up to 30%. These two strains also impacted rhizosphere bacterial groups including Isosphaera and Pirellula (phylum Planctomycetes) and Acidothermus, Pseudolabrys and Singusphaera (phylum Actinobacteria). This is the first study to demonstrate consistent results for the effects of Pseudomonas strains on lettuce growth promotion for seedlings and plants grown under tropical field conditions.

© FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

KEYWORDS:

16S rRNA gene sequencing; Lactuca sativa L.; bacterial community; microbial diversity; rhizobacteria

PMID: 27660605 DOI: 10.1093/femsec/fiw197

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Select item 27660335

 

70.

J Bacteriol. 2016 Sep 22;198(20):2763. doi: 10.1128/JB.00615-16. Print 2016 Oct 15.

Classic Spotlight: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Starch Utilization, and the Birth of the Microbiome Era.

O'Toole GA1.

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PMID: 27660335 DOI: 10.1128/JB.00615-16

[PubMed - in process]

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Select item 27660288

 

71.

JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2016 Sep 22. pii: 0148607116671101. [Epub ahead of print]

Soluble Dietary Fiber Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Intestinal Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Fibrosis.

Yang J1, Ding C1, Dai X1, Lv T1, Xie T1, Zhang T2, Gao W1, Gong J3, Zhu W1, Li N1, Li J1.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intestinal fibrosis is a late complication of pelvic radiotherapy. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in tissue fibrosis. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of soluble dietary fiber on radiation-induced intestinal EMT and fibrosis in a mouse model.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Apple pectin (4% wt/wt in drinking water) was administered to wild-type and pVillin-Cre-EGFP transgenic mice with intestinal fibrosis induced by a single dose of abdominal irradiation of 10 Gy. The effects of pectin on intestinal EMT and fibrosis, gut microbiota, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Intestinal fibrosis in late radiation enteropathy showed increased submucosal thickness and subepithelial collagen deposition. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)+/vimentin+ and EGFP+/α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)+ coexpressing cells were most clearly observed at 2 weeks after irradiation and gradually decreased at 4 and 12 weeks. Pectin significantly attenuated the thickness of submucosa and collagen deposition at 12 weeks (24.3 vs 27.6 µm in the pectin + radiation-treated group compared with radiation-alone group, respectively, P < .05; 69.0% vs 57.1%, P < .001) and ameliorated EMT at 2 and 4 weeks. Pectin also modulated the intestinal microbiota composition and increased the luminal SCFA concentration.

CONCLUSION:

The soluble dietary fiber pectin protected the terminal ileum against radiation-induced fibrosis. This effect might be mediated by altered SCFA concentration in the intestinal lumen and reduced EMT in the ileal epithelium.

© 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

KEYWORDS:

epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition; intestinal fibrosis; radiation; soluble dietary fiber

PMID: 27660288 DOI: 10.1177/0148607116671101

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Select item 27660221

 

72.

Biomed Environ Sci. 2016 Aug;29(8):574-583.

Structural Modulation of Gut Microbiota in Rats with Allergic Bronchial Asthma Treated with Recuperating Lung Decoction.

Kong YH1, Shi Q2, Han N3, Zhang L1, Zhang YY4, Gao TX5, Chen C4, Li YL2.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether recuperating lung decoction (RLD) can modulate the composition of gut microbiota in rats during asthma treatment.

METHODS:

Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly and equally into control group, model group, dexamethasone (DEX) group, RLD medium-dose group, and RLD high-dose group. The asthma model was established in all groups, except for the control group. The rats in the DEX and RLD groups were treated orally with DEX and RLD, respectively. The rats in the control and model groups were treated orally with 0.9% saline. The intestinal bacterial communities were compared among groups using 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing.

RESULTS:

The microbial flora differed between the control and model groups, but the flora in the RLD groups was similar to that in the control group. No significant differences were observed between the RLD high-dose and medium-dose groups. RLD treatment resulted in an increase in the level beneficial bacteria in the gut, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp.

CONCLUSION:

Oral administration of RLD increased the number of intestinal lactic acid-producing bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, in asthma model rats.

Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Gut microbiota; Recuperating lung decoction

PMID: 27660221 DOI: 10.3967/bes2016.076

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Select item 27660180

 

73.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2016 Sep 22. [Epub ahead of print]

Medicinal herbs as a potential strategy to decrease methane production by rumen microbiota: a systematic evaluation with a focus on Perilla frutescens seed extract.

Wang J1,2, Liu M3, Wu Y3, Wang L3, Liu J3, Jiang L4, Yu Z5.

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Abstract

Mitigation of the methane (CH4) emission from ruminants is needed to decrease the environmental impact of ruminant animal production. Different plant materials and chemicals have been tested, but few are both effective and practical. Medicinal herbs contain biological compounds and antimicrobials that may be effective in lowering the CH4 production. However, few studies have systematically evaluated medicinal herbs for their effect on CH4 production or on the rumen microbiota. In this study, extracts from 100 medicinal herbs were assessed for their ability to decrease CH4 production by rumen microbiota in vitro. The extracts of 12 herbs effectively lowered the CH4 production, with the extract of Perilla frutescens seeds being the most effective. The major components of P. frutescens seed extract were identified, and the effects of the extract on the fermentation characteristics and populations of rumen methanogens, fungi, protozoa, and select bacteria were also assessed. The decreased CH4 production induced by the P. frutescens seed extract was accompanied by an increased abundance of Ruminobacter, Selenomonas, Succinivibrio, Shuttleworthis, Pseudobutyrivbrio, Anaerovibrio, and Roseomonas and a decreased abundance of Methanobrevibacter millerae. The abundance of Pedobacter, Anaeroplasma, Paludibacter, Ruminococcus, and unclassified Lachnospiraceae was positively correlated with the CH4 production, with no effects on volatile fatty acids. This study suggests that medicinal herbs may be used to mitigate the CH4 emission from ruminants.

KEYWORDS:

Additive methane inhibition; Archaea; Bacteria; In vitro rumen fermentation; Perilla frutescens

PMID: 27660180 DOI: 10.1007/s00253-016-7830-z

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Select item 27660175

 

74.

J Hepatol. 2016 Sep 19. pii: S0168-8278(16)30325-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2016.07.002. [Epub ahead of print]

The inflammasome in liver disease.

Wree A1, Marra F2.

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KEYWORDS:

Alcoholic liver disease; Caspase-1; Cytokines; DAMPs; Fibrosis; Interleakin-1; Microbiota; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

PMID: 27660175 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhep.2016.07.002

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Select item 27660122

 

75.

Diabetes Care. 2016 Oct;39(10):1830-45. doi: 10.2337/dc15-1182.

Fatty Liver and Chronic Kidney Disease: Novel Mechanistic Insights and Therapeutic Opportunities.

Musso G1, Cassader M2, Cohney S3, De Michieli F2, Pinach S2, Saba F2, Gambino R2.

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Abstract

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). ESRD or CVD develop in a substantial proportion of patients with CKD receiving standard-of-care therapy, and mortality in CKD remains unchanged. These data suggest that key pathogenetic mechanisms underlying CKD progression go unaffected by current treatments. Growing evidence suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and CKD share common pathogenetic mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Common nutritional conditions predisposing to both NAFLD and CKD include excessive fructose intake and vitamin D deficiency. Modulation of nuclear transcription factors regulating key pathways of lipid metabolism, inflammation, and fibrosis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and farnesoid X receptor, is advancing to stage III clinical development. The relevance of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CKD is also emerging, and modulation of microRNA21 is a promising therapeutic target. Although single antioxidant supplementation has yielded variable results, modulation of key effectors of redox regulation and molecular sensors of intracellular energy, nutrient, or oxygen status show promising preclinical results. Other emerging therapeutic approaches target key mediators of inflammation, such as chemokines; fibrogenesis, such as galectin-3; or gut dysfunction through gut microbiota manipulation and incretin-based therapies. Furthermore, NAFLD per se affects CKD through lipoprotein metabolism and hepatokine secretion, and conversely, targeting the renal tubule by sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors can improve both CKD and NAFLD. Implications for the treatment of NAFLD and CKD are discussed in light of this new therapeutic armamentarium.

© 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

PMID: 27660122 DOI: 10.2337/dc15-1182

[PubMed - in process]

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Select item 27659943

 

76.

Sci Rep. 2016 Sep 23;6:33721. doi: 10.1038/srep33721.

IMNGS: A comprehensive open resource of processed 16S rRNA microbial profiles for ecology and diversity studies.

Lagkouvardos I1, Joseph D1, Kapfhammer M1, Giritli S1, Horn M2, Haller D1,3, Clavel T1.

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Abstract

The SRA (Sequence Read Archive) serves as primary depository for massive amounts of Next Generation Sequencing data, and currently host over 100,000 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based microbial profiles from various host habitats and environments. This number is increasing rapidly and there is a dire need for approaches to utilize this pool of knowledge. Here we created IMNGS (Integrated Microbial Next Generation Sequencing), an innovative platform that uniformly and systematically screens for and processes all prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets available in SRA and uses them to build sample-specific sequence databases and OTU-based profiles. Via a web interface, this integrative sequence resource can easily be queried by users. We show examples of how the approach allows testing the ecological importance of specific microorganisms in different hosts or ecosystems, and performing targeted diversity studies for selected taxonomic groups. The platform also offers a complete workflow for de novo analysis of users' own raw 16S rRNA gene amplicon datasets for the sake of comparison with existing data. IMNGS can be accessed at www.imngs.org.

PMID: 27659943 DOI: 10.1038/srep33721

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Select item 27659735

 

77.

J Antimicrob Chemother. 2016 Sep 22. pii: dkw385. [Epub ahead of print]

Role of cephalosporins in the era of Clostridium difficile infection.

Wilcox MH1, Chalmers JD2, Nord CE3, Freeman J4, Bouza E5.

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Abstract

The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in Europe has increased markedly since 2000. Previous meta-analyses have suggested a strong association between cephalosporin use and CDI, and many national programmes on CDI control have focused on reducing cephalosporin usage. Despite reductions in cephalosporin use, however, rates of CDI have continued to rise. This review examines the potential association of CDI with cephalosporins, and considers other factors that influence CDI risk. EUCLID (the EUropean, multicentre, prospective biannual point prevalence study of CLostridium difficile Infection in hospitalized patients with Diarrhoea) reported an increase in the annual incidence of CDI from 6.6 to 7.3 cases per 10 000 patient bed-days from 2011-12 to 2012-13, respectively. While CDI incidence and cephalosporin usage varied widely across countries studied, there was no clear association between overall cephalosporin prescribing (or the use of any particular cephalosporin) and CDI incidence. Moreover, variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of cephalosporins of the same generation make categorization by generation insufficient for predicting impact on gut microbiota. A multitude of additional factors can affect the risk of CDI. Antibiotic choice is an important consideration; however, CDI risk is associated with a range of antibiotic classes. Prescription of multiple antibiotics and a long duration of treatment are key risk factors for CDI, and risk also differs across patient populations. We propose that all of these are factors that should be taken into account when selecting an antibiotic, rather than focusing on the exclusion of individual drug classes.

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

PMID: 27659735 DOI: 10.1093/jac/dkw385

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Select item 27659481

 

78.

Sci Rep. 2016 Sep 23;6:33969. doi: 10.1038/srep33969.

Expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor contributes to the establishment of intestinal microbial community structure in mice.

Murray IA1, Nichols RG1, Zhang L1,2, Patterson AD1, Perdew GH1.

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Abstract

Environmental and genetic factors represent key components in the establishment/maintenance of the intestinal microbiota. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is emerging as a pleiotropic factor, modulating pathways beyond its established role as a xenobiotic sensor. The AHR is known to regulate immune surveillance within the intestine through retention of intraepithelial lymphocytes, functional redistribution of Th17/Treg balance. Consequently, environmental/genetic manipulation of AHR activity likely influences host-microbe homeostasis. Utilizing C57BL6/J Ahr-/+ and Ahr-/- co-housed littermates followed by 18 days of genotypic segregation, we examined the influence of AHR expression upon intestinal microbe composition/functionality and host physiology. 16S sequencing/quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed significant changes in phyla abundance, particularly Verrucomicrobia together with segmented filamentous bacteria, and an increase in species diversity in Ahr-/- mice following genotypic segregation. Metagenomics/metabolomics indicate microbial composition is associated with functional shifts in bacterial metabolism. Analysis identified Ahr-/--dependent increases in ileal gene expression, indicating increased inflammatory tone. Transfer of Ahr-/- microbiota to wild-type germ-free mice recapitulated the increase Verrucomicrobia and inflammatory tone, indicating Ahr-/--microbial dependence. These data suggest a role for the AHR in influencing the community structure of the intestinal microbiota.

PMID: 27659481 DOI: 10.1038/srep33969

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Select item 27659221

 

79.

Brief Funct Genomics. 2016 Sep 22. pii: elw034. [Epub ahead of print]

Computational operon prediction in whole-genomes and metagenomes.

Zaidi SS, Zhang X.

Abstract

Microbial diversity in unique environmental settings enables abrupt responses catalysed by altering the gene regulation and formation of gene clusters called operons. Operons increases bacterial adaptability, which in turn increases their survival. This review article presents the emergence of computational operon prediction methods for whole microbial genomes and metagenomes, and discusses their strengths and limitations. Most of the whole-genome operon prediction methods struggle to generalize on unrelated genomes. The applicability of universal whole-genome operon prediction methods to metagenomic data is an interesting yet less investigated question. We have evaluated the potential of various operon prediction features for genomic and metagenomic data. Most of operon prediction methods with high accuracy have been compiled into databases. Despite of the high predictive performance, the data among many databases are not completely consistent for similar species. We performed a correlation analysis between the computationally predicted operon databases and experimentally validated data for Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Operon prediction for most of the less characterized microbes cannot be verified due to absence of experimentally validated operons. The generation of validated information for other microbes would test the authenticity of operon databases for other less annotated microbes as well. Advances in sequencing technologies and development of better analysis methods will help researchers to overcome the technological hurdles (such as long sequencing reads and improved contig size) and further improve operon predictions and better utilize operonic information.

© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

KEYWORDS:

: operon prediction; gene regulation; metagenome; microbiome; secondary metabolites

PMID: 27659221 DOI: 10.1093/bfgp/elw034

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Select item 27658722

 

80.

Sci Rep. 2016 Sep 23;6:33566. doi: 10.1038/srep33566.

Gut microbiota Modulated by Probiotics and Garcinia cambogia Extract Correlate with Weight Gain and Adipocyte Sizes in High Fat-Fed Mice.

Heo J1, Seo M1,2, Park H3, Lee WK3, Guan LL4, Yoon J2, Caetano-Anolles K5, Ahn H5, Kim SY6, Kang YM6, Cho S1, Kim H1,2,5.

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Abstract

Results of recent studies on gut microbiota have suggested that obesogenic bacteria exacerbate obesity and metabolic dysfunction in the host when fed a high fat diet (HFD). In order to explore obesity-associated bacterial candidates and their response to diet, the composition of faecal bacterial communities was investigated by analyzing 16S rRNA gene sequences in mice. Dietary intervention with probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract attenuated weight gain and adipocyte size in HFD-fed mice. To identify obesity-causative microbiota, two statistical analyses were performed. Forty-eight bacterial species were found to overlap between the two analyses, indicating the commonly identified species as diet-driven and obesity-associated, which would make them strong candidates for host-microbiome interaction on obesity. Finally, correlation based network analysis between diet, microbe, and host revealed that Clostridium aminophilum, a hyper-ammonia-producing bacterium, was highly correlated with obesity phenotypes and other associated bacteria, and shown to be suppressed by the combination of probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract. Results of the present study suggest that probiotics and Garcinia cambogia extract alleviate weight gain and adiposity, in part via differentially modulating the composition of gut microbiota in HFD fed mice.

PMID: 27658722 DOI: 10.1038/srep33566

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16.

Microbiome. 2016 Sep 27;4(1):51.

The impact of sequence database choice on metaproteomic results in gut microbiota studies.

Tanca A1, Palomba A1, Fraumene C1, Pagnozzi D1, Manghina V2, Deligios M2, Muth T3,4, Rapp E3, Martens L5,6,7, Addis MF1, Uzzau S8,9.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elucidating the role of gut microbiota in physiological and pathological processes has recently emerged as a key research aim in life sciences. In this respect, metaproteomics, the study of the whole protein complement of a microbial community, can provide a unique contribution by revealing which functions are actually being expressed by specific microbial taxa. However, its wide application to gut microbiota research has been hindered by challenges in data analysis, especially related to the choice of the proper sequence databases for protein identification.

RESULTS:

Here, we present a systematic investigation of variables concerning database construction and annotation and evaluate their impact on human and mouse gut metaproteomic results. We found that both publicly available and experimental metagenomic databases lead to the identification of unique peptide assortments, suggesting parallel database searches as a mean to gain more complete information. In particular, the contribution of experimental metagenomic databases was revealed to be mandatory when dealing with mouse samples. Moreover, the use of a "merged" database, containing all metagenomic sequences from the population under study, was found to be generally preferable over the use of sample-matched databases. We also observed that taxonomic and functional results are strongly database-dependent, in particular when analyzing the mouse gut microbiota. As a striking example, the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio varied up to tenfold depending on the database used. Finally, assembling reads into longer contigs provided significant advantages in terms of functional annotation yields.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study contributes to identify host- and database-specific biases which need to be taken into account in a metaproteomic experiment, providing meaningful insights on how to design gut microbiota studies and to perform metaproteomic data analysis. In particular, the use of multiple databases and annotation tools has to be encouraged, even though this requires appropriate bioinformatic resources.

KEYWORDS:

Bioinformatics; Gut microbiota; Mass spectrometry; Metagenomics; Metaproteomics

PMID: 27671352 DOI: 10.1186/s40168-016-0196-8

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Select item 27671222

 

17.

Colorectal Dis. 2016 Sep 27. doi: 10.1111/codi.13534. [Epub ahead of print]

A collaborative study of the current concepts and challenges for treatment of anastomotic leakage in colorectal surgery.

Vallance A1,2, Wexner S3, Berho M4, Cahill R5, Coleman M6, Haboubi N7, Heald RJ8, Kennedy RH9, Moran B8, Mortensen N2, Motson RW10, Novell R11, O'Connell PR5, Ris F12, Rockall T13, Senapati A14, Windsor A15, Jayne DG16.

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Abstract

The reduction of the incidence, detection, and treatment of anastomotic leakage (AL) continues to challenge the colorectal surgical community. AL is not consistently defined and reported in clinical studies, its occurrence is variably reported and its impact on long-term morbidity and healthcare resources has received relatively little attention. Controversy continues about the best strategies to reduce the risk. Diagnostic tests lack sensitivity and specificity, resulting in delayed diagnosis and increased morbidity. Intraoperative fluorescence angiography has recently been introduced as a means of real-time assessment of anastomotic perfusion with preliminary evidence suggesting that it may reduce the rate of AL. In addition, concepts are emerging about the role of the rectal mucosal microbiome in AL and the possible role of new prophylactic therapies. In January 2016 a meeting of expert colorectal surgeons and pathologists was held in London, UK to identify the ongoing controversies surrounding AL in colorectal surgery. The outcome of the meeting is presented in the form of research challenges that need to be addressed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 27671222 DOI: 10.1111/codi.13534

 

16s rRNA Sequencing with MR DNA

16S ribosomal  (rRNA) sequencing using next generation sequencing is a method used to identify and compare bacteria and archaea present within almost any type of sample. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a well-established method for studying phylogeny and taxonomy of samples from complex microbiomes or environments that are difficult or impossible to study.

 

 

 

 

16s sequencing illumina or PGM low cost prices with MR DNA

MR DNA is a next generation sequencing provider with low cost 16s sequencing services.

Select item 27670882

 

19.

Sci Rep. 2016 Sep 27;6:33965. doi: 10.1038/srep33965.

Probiotic legacy effects on gut microbial assembly in tilapia larvae.

Giatsis C1, Sipkema D2, Ramiro-Garcia J2,3,4, Bacanu GM2, Abernathy J5, Verreth J1, Smidt H2, Verdegem M1.

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Abstract

The exposure of fish to environmental free-living microbes and its effect on early colonization in the gut have been studied in recent years. However, little is known regarding how the host and environment interact to shape gut communities during early life. Here, we tested whether the early microbial exposure of tilapia larvae affects the gut microbiota at later life stages. The experimental period was divided into three stages: axenic, probiotic and active suspension. Axenic tilapia larvae were reared either under conventional conditions (active suspension systems) or exposed to a single strain probiotic (Bacillus subtilis) added to the water. Microbial characterization by Illumina HiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons showed the presence of B. subtilis in the gut during the seven days of probiotic application. Although B. subtilis was no longer detected in the guts of fish exposed to the probiotic after day 7, gut microbiota of the exposed tilapia larvae remained significantly different from that of the control treatment. Compared with the control, fish gut microbiota under probiotic treatment was less affected by spatial differences resulting from tank replication, suggesting that the early probiotic contact contributed to the subsequent observation of low inter-individual variation.

PMID: 27670882 DOI: 10.1038/srep33965

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Select item 27670644

 

20.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2016 Sep 27. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201600552. [Epub ahead of print]

Reduction in cardiometabolic risk factors by a multifunctional diet is mediated via several branches of metabolism as evidenced by non-targeted metabolite profiling approach.

Tovar J1, de Mello VD2, Nilsson A3, Johansson M3, Paananen J2, Lehtonen M4, Hanhineva K2, Björck I3.

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Abstract

SCOPE:

MFD, a diet based on multiple functional concepts and ingredients with antiinflammatory activity, was previously shown to improve different cardiometabolic risk-associated markers in healthy subjects. Here, we assessed the impact of MFD on plasma metabolome and explored associations of the differential metabolites with clinical parameters, searching for metabolic determinants related to the effects of MFD.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Forty-four overweight healthy volunteers completed a randomized crossover intervention comparing MFD with a control diet devoid of the active components of MFD. Fasting plasma samples were analyzed with non-targeted metabolite profiling at baseline and at the end (4 wk) of each diet period by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight-MS system, revealing a vast impact of MFD on metabolic homeostasis. Main metabolite classes affected included acylcarnitines, furan fatty acids, phospholipids (plasmalogens, phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines), and various low-molecular weight products from the bioactivity of gut microbiota. Circulating levels of several of these metabolites correlated with changes in clinical blood lipid biomarkers.

CONCLUSIONS:

The metabolomics approach revealed that consumption of MFD affected different areas of metabolism, highlighting the impact of a healthy diet on plasma metabolome. This seems linked to reduced cardiometabolic risk and provides mechanistic insight into the effects of MFD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiometabolic diseases; Dietary prevention; Functional foods; Metabolic syndrome; Plasma metabolomics

PMID: 27670644 DOI: 10.1002/mnfr.201600552

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16s rRNA Sequencing with MR DNA

16S ribosomal  (rRNA) sequencing using next generation sequencing is a method used to identify and compare bacteria and archaea present within almost any type of sample. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a well-established method for studying phylogeny and taxonomy of samples from complex microbiomes or environments that are difficult or impossible to study.

 

 

 

 

16s sequencing illumina or PGM low cost prices with MR DNA

MR DNA is a next generation sequencing provider with low cost 16s sequencing services.

 

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